How to Treat Myopia in Children

Categories
Uncategorised

How to Treat Myopia in Children

Myopia, otherwise known as nearsightedness, is a super prevalent eye condition. According to research, more of us are getting nearsighted or myopic. What’s troubling are the recent statistics on how myopia progression is spreading in young children.

In myopia, your eye grows more protracted than usual from top to back, or the cornea is too curved. As a result, distant things may look blurry.

Patients can correct myopia with the help of glasses, contact lenses, or in some instances, surgery. However, short-sightedness can increase your chances of developing worse eye problems like glaucoma, cataracts, and retinal detachment.

Failure to treat myopia during early ages can increase the likelihood of worsening or developing severe complications. Here are some of the most effective ways to treat myopia in children:

Low Dose Atropine Eye Drops

Low-dose atropine eye drops are used to widen your pupils during eye exams. It can slow down the progress of myopia if children receive small, regular doses.

Doctors and eye specialists have yet to determine how the drops work, but they believe the drops prevent the eye from lengthening too much. Since myopia worsens with the elongation of the eye, putting the brakes on its increase can prevent myopia from progressing.

Typically, doctors recommend low-dose atropine for children between 5 and 18 years old. Put the drops in your eyes each night before bedtime. In case you experience side effects like redness or itchiness, contact your doctor.

Orthokeratology

Multifocal contact lenses are another great way to slow down the progression of myopia. Your doctor may prescribe them to slow the progression of myopia.

Back in 2019, MiSight contact lenses became the first FDA-approved treatment for myopia in the U.S. Make sure you get daily disposable contact lenses that fit your needs according to a specialty-trained optometrist or an ophthalmologist.

One more recommended use of contact lenses, although less recommended, is referred to as orthokeratology. In Ortho-K, patients use rigid,gas-permeable contact lenses each night to reshape the front part of the eye.

Unfortunately, a rebound effect, i.e., a spike in the progression of myopia, occurs once you stop Ortho-K treatment. In addition, contact lenses pose various risks, including ulcers, infections, corneal abrasions, and scarring that leads to permanent loss of vision.

Increased Time Out in the Sun Away From Electronic Devices

A rising concern is the increased use of electronic devices during the Covid-19 pandemic. Unfortunately, higher use of electronic devices can speed up the progression of myopia.

At the same time, multiple instances of in-depth researchindicate that exposure to natural light can decrease the risks of developing myopia. Therefore, doctors recommend parents encourage their children to spend at least 2 hours outside per day.

To Sum it Up

Before you follow a treatment plan, make sure you discuss all the risks and benefits of treatment options with your pediatric optometrist.

Ensure your child spends more time outdoors and has limited screen time. By keeping a healthy balance between screen time and outdoor time, you can protect your little one from developing myopia.

Sources

https://www.allaboutvision.com/parents/myopia.htm

https://aapos.org/glossary/treatment-for-progressive-myopia

https://www.aao.org/eye-health/treatments/myopia-control-in-children

https://www.mykidsvision.org/blog/myopia-myths-what-has-evidence/

https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/8579-myopia-nearsightedness

Myopia, otherwise known as nearsightedness, is a super prevalent eye condition. According to research, more of us are getting nearsighted or myopic. What’s troubling are the recent statistics on how myopia progression is spreading in young children.

In myopia, your eye grows more protracted than usual from top to back, or the cornea is too curved. As a result, distant things may look blurry.

Patients can correct myopia with the help of glasses, contact lenses, or in some instances, surgery. However, short-sightedness can increase your chances of developing worse eye problems like glaucoma, cataracts, and retinal detachment.

Failure to treat myopia during early ages can increase the likelihood of worsening or developing severe complications. Here are some of the most effective ways to treat myopia in children:

Low Dose Atropine Eye Drops

Low-dose atropine eye drops are used to widen your pupils during eye exams. It can slow down the progress of myopia if children receive small, regular doses.

Doctors and eye specialists have yet to determine how the drops work, but they believe the drops prevent the eye from lengthening too much. Since myopia worsens with the elongation of the eye, putting the brakes on its increase can prevent myopia from progressing.

Typically, doctors recommend low-dose atropine for children between 5 and 18 years old. Put the drops in your eyes each night before bedtime. In case you experience side effects like redness or itchiness, contact your doctor.

Orthokeratology

Multifocal contact lenses are another great way to slow down the progression of myopia. Your doctor may prescribe them to slow the progression of myopia.

Back in 2019, MiSight contact lenses became the first FDA-approved treatment for myopia in the U.S. Make sure you get daily disposable contact lenses that fit your needs according to a specialty-trained optometrist or an ophthalmologist.

One more recommended use of contact lenses, although less recommended, is referred to as orthokeratology. In Ortho-K, patients use rigid,gas-permeable contact lenses each night to reshape the front part of the eye.

Unfortunately, a rebound effect, i.e., a spike in the progression of myopia, occurs once you stop Ortho-K treatment. In addition, contact lenses pose various risks, including ulcers, infections, corneal abrasions, and scarring that leads to permanent loss of vision.

Increased Time Out in the Sun Away From Electronic Devices

A rising concern is the increased use of electronic devices during the Covid-19 pandemic. Unfortunately, higher use of electronic devices can speed up the progression of myopia.

At the same time, multiple instances of in-depth researchindicate that exposure to natural light can decrease the risks of developing myopia. Therefore, doctors recommend parents encourage their children to spend at least 2 hours outside per day.

To Sum it Up

Before you follow a treatment plan, make sure you discuss all the risks and benefits of treatment options with your pediatric optometrist.

Ensure your child spends more time outdoors and has limited screen time. By keeping a healthy balance between screen time and outdoor time, you can protect your little one from developing myopia.

Sources

https://www.allaboutvision.com/parents/myopia.htm

https://aapos.org/glossary/treatment-for-progressive-myopia

https://www.aao.org/eye-health/treatments/myopia-control-in-children

https://www.mykidsvision.org/blog/myopia-myths-what-has-evidence/

https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/8579-myopia-nearsightedness

About Dr. Shefali Miglani

Dr. Shefali Miglani is a practicing Optometrist and a Myopia Management Specialist. As the Chief Medical Officer of Hoot Myopia Care, she helps to design clinical guidelines, create content and oversee all the clinical aspects of the platform and works with other doctors in the Hoot community to help manage progressive myopia in kids. She has her own private practice called Monroe Eye Care, in Monroe Township, NJ 08831, where she sees families with comprehensive eye care and specializes in myopia management of kids. She and her husband Bob Miglani together raise their three children in New Jersey.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.