INTERVIEW WITH DR. TODD COHAN

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INTERVIEW WITH DR. TODD COHAN

Dr. Shefali Miglani:
Hi, my name is Dr. Shefali Miglani and I’m an optometrist with my own private practice in New Jersey called Monroe eyecare. I’m also the chief medical officer of Hoot Myopia Care. Hoot is a parent education platform that helps optometrists enable parents to learn about myopia progression and to do something about it for their children. Today, I’m speaking with Dr. Todd Cohan, a fellow optometrist and myopia management specialist running his private practice in beautiful Long Grove, Illinois called Foresight Vision. Dr. Cohan has recently joined a growing community of myopia management specialists here at Hoot Myopia care. Dr. Cohan. Hello and welcome to Hoot

Dr. Todd Cohan:
Hi, thank you so much for having me on this broadcast.

Dr. Shefali Miglani:
It’s my pleasure. So for parents who don’t know anything about myopia, can you please tell us about what myopia is?

Dr. Todd Cohan:
Sure. So the way I explain it to my patients, and I’ve been in practice for 20 years already, is that myopia is the vision correction that makes you be nearsighted as people term it, and myopia is the technical term for that, where they actually, the length of the eye gets longer and longer. As the eye continues to grow it causes blurry vision from far away. Thus people need to have glasses or contact lenses to refract their vision.

Dr. Shefali Miglani:
Very good. And why should the parents care that their child has myopia?

Dr. Todd Cohan:
Well lately. I mean, the numbers are insane, in fact, there’s a thing called the myopia epidemic, which is affecting the world population. In fact, it was several years ago, they said almost 90% of kids in Asian countries, Korea, Japan, China are becoming near-sighted because of the problem of kids not playing outside as much, people looking at their screens too much. And the reason why I always caution parents about, especially if we see significant jumps as children are progressing, I always tell the patients the kid’s legs get longer and guess what their eyes get longer. The problem is that the eyes are getting longer at a rate never seen in history before, there are global studies looking at the effect of reasons why this is happening. And most of it is related to extended near work and not going outside as much. The problem is, is all of us are born with a certain amount of retina, the lining of the inside of our eyes, the problem is, is something that’s stretched, kind of like stretching a balloon more and more and more and more and more, it becomes thinner and you have a higher chance down the road in 20 or 30 years when these kids are 30, 40 years old, retinal detachments would require retinal surgery, glaucoma, lots of other vision-threatening eye diseases. And that’s why parents should take more of a proactive versus a reactive role of just giving your kids stronger glasses every year.

Dr. Shefali Miglani:
Right. Right. And then coming out of COVID, have you seen this extensive near work that kids are doing with online schooling, greater use of devices in your practice? Have you seen a recent change in your known patient demographic and what the results are and the exam room?

Dr. Todd Cohan:
Absolutely. I mean, we’re seeing seven or eight-year-old kids with prescriptions that I used to see people in their late teens and 20-year-olds. And it’s really, the last three years I would say is really kind of starting to really escalate in severity. Not only that, but kids are coming in with complaints of eye strain, headaches, and eye fatigue, something that’s really crazy, and we have a specialty dry eye clinic as well, if the kids are having dry eye issues. I mean, if you told me 20 years ago, when I graduated from optometry school, that we’d be talking about dry eye with teenagers, you know, I’d say Yeah, sure. Right. You know, but it’s a problem. Kids get styes all the time and like the bumps on the eyelid and all that is due to a lack of blinking. You’re not blinking and your body’s staring, your eyes are overworking, which is leading to this myopia epidemic as well as dry eye disease as well. It’s pretty crazy.

Dr. Shefali Miglani:
And have you noticed any correlation to device use and how much devices use your kid’s patient population? You know, goes through, you know, can you tell us a little bit about that and the change in the past year?

Dr. Todd Cohan:
Yeah. It’s been really crazy because I mean, with, you know, everything has been switching, at least in our area of the country to, you know, get rid of, burn the textbooks, and have everything online anyway, I was mind-boggled when my kids were in elementary school and they’re doing math on their iPads for two hours at home. It’s just crazy. You’re not getting away from the screen time. Also in the world. They used to always say that near-sightedness or myopia would typically slow down in the summer months. Why? Because kids are outside playing, they’re being kids. Right. And now the problem is, is these kids that go there at the bus stop, you can take pictures of them every morning on their phones. They’re heads down on the bus stop playing games, texting, tik-toking, whatever he may have been.

Dr .Todd Cohan:
They’re on the devices. And what’s really bad is that standardized tests at school, then that’s all done online too. I mean, my daughter came home and she’s like, I have a headache. I was on the computer for four hours, and then when they came home, they did their homework on their iPad or Macbook or Chromebook and then time to play Fortnite. And they’re on that computer. I mean, it’s like, it’s, it’s, they’re, they’re glued, it’s like a third arm to do the screens and it’s really affecting the kid’s near-sightedness. And I think parents are finally starting to realize how damaging it is.

Dr. Shefali Miglani:
Right. So is Long Grove any different than the rest of the world, the rest of the United States, do you see kids playing outside at all?

Dr. Todd Cohan:
No. Hardly at all. I mean, you know, we’re probably similar in, in our generation, you know, we’d be outside playing and riding bikes till it came dark and things like that. And, you know, aside from organizing sports, the kids are playing that they’re a travel team, this travel thing that may be for a couple hour window a day, but their glued side, they’re not out and about. It’s rare when you see a group of kids biking down the street. I mean, it’s really, yeah, it’s really bad in our high school in particular, it’s like a top 30 high school, public high school in the country. And, you know, these kids are just thrown with all these intense academic demands, and now the way they connect socially is they’re on their phones. Right. My teenage daughter is as much as I yell at her, she’s on the phone, it’s eight o’clock, she’s watching TV and she’s on her phone. So it’s like, she’s the norm. Unfortunately.

Dr. Shefali Miglani:
Exactly. That’s what we see here in our household and hear from my patients in my practice. All right. So now walk us through what parents should be thinking about as their kids return to school.

Dr. Todd Cohan:
So, you know, there’s been lots of stuff in the news about blue light, blue light, blue light. Personally, I educate patients this way. I said blue light does prove to mess up your sleep patterns and things like that. But more importantly than anything else. Cause we gotta reduce the eye focusing demand. We got to give kids a little bit of magnification to relax their eyes. We have to, if we start seeing near-sightedness, we want to kind of stop it. And I always tell patients, I’d rather be proactive than reactive. I’d rather do something proactive for your children to stop your kid’s near-sightedness rather than waiting on the sideline, watching them get worse year after year, after year, I always try to educate them. And I think parents appreciate this in the exam room because you know, mom and dad would always say, you know, do this, do this, do this.

Dr. Todd Cohan:
But if they’re hearing it from a doctor who they trust and they’ve been going through for a while saying, you know what, you know, little Johnny, you really need to take breaks, go outside, you know, put a timer on your Fortnite every half-hour, walk around the house, do a Cartwheel. I don’t care. Give your eyes a break every once in a while. And I think they like hearing that taking breaks and things like that. But parents, you know, everybody, you go to a restaurant they’re glued to their screens. I mean, it’s brutal. It’s a terrible travesty these days.

Dr. Shefali Miglani:
So kids have been home, uh, you know, for so long on their computers. What should the parents be on the lookout for?

Dr. Todd Cohan:
So I think the parents should be on the lookout for, I mean, if they’re going like this and they’re watching TV, I mean near-sightedness and prescription changes aren’t one of those things where, you know, one day you notice that one day you’re not, it’s not like a light switch up. I can see, I can’t see. It has to deal with things like squinting, weird visual behaviors of people tilting their head to see or closing an eye when looking for distance or something in terms of, you know, getting closer to their TV or their phone, things like that. I mean, um, those are signs and symptoms that, you know, and always, and you’ve been in practice as long as I have, it never fails that there’s a mom or dad who comes in, says I had no idea, they were seeing so bad it’s every day. And especially the parents, who’ve never worn glasses or contacts until they’re 40 years old. So they don’t have any understanding of it. And they feel really bad, but it’s, you know, that’s the importance of routine eye care. We can check these minor changes every year.

Dr. Shefali Miglani:
So if their kids do have these symptoms of the children who do have these symptoms, what should they do? What should the parents do?

Dr. Todd Cohan:
Obviously, we say, get a comprehensive eye exam. For some reason that the lobby, the dentist lobby is ingrained for 50 years, go get your teeth cleaned twice a year. Well, I always joke we can, you, you can learn, you can get straight A’s with, with tartar on your teeth or cavities. You can, you can’t get straight A’s if you can’t see. So, you know, I always tell them it’s so important to come in every single year. And our state Illinois has a really good job. Beginning of getting the kids in for kindergarten eye exams, state mandate. And I think it is in most states now, but we really in our practice enforce the fact that, and emphasize how important it is to come in every single year, check the healthy eye and check the prescription changes because this day and age with devices, it’s brutal. But, um, we still, you know, there’s, uh, every, every, every month we have a kid that hasn’t been in since their character exit for kids fifth-grade and it’s a minus two prescription for those of you who don’t know, it’s pretty, near-sighted, can’t even see the ear on the wall with that prescription.

Dr. Shefali Miglani:
So what are some go-to therapies for myopia management?

Dr. Todd Cohan:
So I’ve been, um, certified orthokeratology since 2003. Um, that’s one of the companies, in particular, that was one of when they kind of first started. So we’ve been doing it for, oh my gosh, 18 years now. That’s been our primary focus. In that, since I was the first thing you have the group we’ve since added the last couple of years, uh, after being therapy as well, um, which entails using an eyedrop at night to kind of defocus the, I would do some of that eye strain and that slows down the prescription changes as well. Um, we typically do that in the younger population. Um, you know, most kids around eight, nine years old can handle the special contacts at night or contact lenses during the day that have a multifocal re reducing the strain when they look up close. But that’s what it’s about.

Dr. Todd Cohan:
It’s all about reducing the eyestrain. If you don’t like it, I always tell patients, look, if you’re on the treadmill 10 points, oh, guess what? You’re gonna get tired and it’s gonna wear you out. Same thing. That’s what’s happening all day every day. So we really try to Institute the therapies that, but they’re Candace seven and a half, eight years old, depending on the child’s responsibility, since these are FDA approved and so completely healthy and safe. I mean, in all our years, 18 years, knock on wood or whatever. We’ve never had any issues whatsoever of kids not being able to wear the contacts at night or do the attribute therapy and we’ve seen amazing results.

Dr. Shefali Miglani:
Right. And, um, what about behavior modification? Do you talk to the kids or the parents and the examiner? What about that?

Dr. Todd Cohan:
Okay. In terms of behavior modification, again, taking breaks, we always like them to be a kind of arm’s length distance for their screens or computers. Well lit lighting, not looking down like this good posture, those types of things, not on the couch mean you saw it. It was like, you know, an epidemic of kids in their pajamas all year, last year with their Macbooks or computers or iPads just laying in their bed like this. And it’s just, it wasn’t very good. And they’re closer to the screen, which is further increasing eye strain. So does that kind of stuff that you go over as well?

Dr. Shefali Miglani:
Absolutely. You know, we go over a lot of behavior modification and, and, you know, you, you summarized it pretty, you know, on point finally tell us, uh, one piece of advice that you would give for the parents who have kids and their eyesight, uh, seems to be getting worse.

Dr. Todd Cohan:
Well, I would definitely say this. The thing that frustrates me every day is the fact that this is not new technology. This technology has been around for, well, it used to be called, orthokeratology kind of like orthodontics for your eye. I think they’ve been doing that in China for like 50 years or something like that. And it wasn’t as nice and comfy as it is now, but they did it. So when paid parents come in and they say, whoa, this news, how come my other doctor never told me this, it’s just really upsetting to me. And the fact that there are so many of our colleagues that work in all different facets of eyecare, whether it’s the retail chains or a surgical center, or a private practice setting, and everybody needs to be educated from a practitioner’s point of view. And it, oh, if you don’t do it in your office, that’s fine, but refer to someone that does, because in the end, we all know, I don’t think anyone can argue that you’re not using the patient’s best interest in mind slowing down their prescription. If there’s something we’ve done, where are they just trying to monetize and their pair of glasses every single year. So in terms of a patients to answer your question a parent’s perspective, if, if you’re out there and you haven’t heard about this, we’ll do some, you know, Googling and figure out someone in your area that does, because you want to be able to, um, make sure your child is being taking care of as best as they can be.

Dr. Shefali Miglani:
Perfect. Perfect. All right. Let’s wrap up today. We spoke to Dr. Cohan, fellow optometrist, and owner of foresight vision, and then now a proud who’d myopia care specialist. Thank you doctor for your time today. Hope to see you soon.

Dr. Todd Cohan:
Sounds great. Thanks so much.

Dr. Shefali Miglani:
Hi, my name is Dr. Shefali Miglani and I’m an optometrist with my own private practice in New Jersey called Monroe eyecare. I’m also the chief medical officer of Hoot Myopia Care. Hoot is a parent education platform that helps optometrists enable parents to learn about myopia progression and to do something about it for their children. Today, I’m speaking with Dr. Todd Cohan, a fellow optometrist and myopia management specialist running his private practice in beautiful Long Grove, Illinois called Foresight Vision. Dr. Cohan has recently joined a growing community of myopia management specialists here at Hoot Myopia care. Dr. Cohan. Hello and welcome to Hoot

Dr. Todd Cohan:
Hi, thank you so much for having me on this broadcast.

Dr. Shefali Miglani:
It’s my pleasure. So for parents who don’t know anything about myopia, can you please tell us about what myopia is?

Dr. Todd Cohan:
Sure. So the way I explain it to my patients, and I’ve been in practice for 20 years already, is that myopia is the vision correction that makes you be nearsighted as people term it, and myopia is the technical term for that, where they actually, the length of the eye gets longer and longer. As the eye continues to grow it causes blurry vision from far away. Thus people need to have glasses or contact lenses to refract their vision.

Dr. Shefali Miglani:
Very good. And why should the parents care that their child has myopia?

Dr. Todd Cohan:
Well lately. I mean, the numbers are insane, in fact, there’s a thing called the myopia epidemic, which is affecting the world population. In fact, it was several years ago, they said almost 90% of kids in Asian countries, Korea, Japan, China are becoming near-sighted because of the problem of kids not playing outside as much, people looking at their screens too much. And the reason why I always caution parents about, especially if we see significant jumps as children are progressing, I always tell the patients the kid’s legs get longer and guess what their eyes get longer. The problem is that the eyes are getting longer at a rate never seen in history before, there are global studies looking at the effect of reasons why this is happening. And most of it is related to extended near work and not going outside as much. The problem is, is all of us are born with a certain amount of retina, the lining of the inside of our eyes, the problem is, is something that’s stretched, kind of like stretching a balloon more and more and more and more and more, it becomes thinner and you have a higher chance down the road in 20 or 30 years when these kids are 30, 40 years old, retinal detachments would require retinal surgery, glaucoma, lots of other vision-threatening eye diseases. And that’s why parents should take more of a proactive versus a reactive role of just giving your kids stronger glasses every year.

Dr. Shefali Miglani:
Right. Right. And then coming out of COVID, have you seen this extensive near work that kids are doing with online schooling, greater use of devices in your practice? Have you seen a recent change in your known patient demographic and what the results are and the exam room?

Dr. Todd Cohan:
Absolutely. I mean, we’re seeing seven or eight-year-old kids with prescriptions that I used to see people in their late teens and 20-year-olds. And it’s really, the last three years I would say is really kind of starting to really escalate in severity. Not only that, but kids are coming in with complaints of eye strain, headaches, and eye fatigue, something that’s really crazy, and we have a specialty dry eye clinic as well, if the kids are having dry eye issues. I mean, if you told me 20 years ago, when I graduated from optometry school, that we’d be talking about dry eye with teenagers, you know, I’d say Yeah, sure. Right. You know, but it’s a problem. Kids get styes all the time and like the bumps on the eyelid and all that is due to a lack of blinking. You’re not blinking and your body’s staring, your eyes are overworking, which is leading to this myopia epidemic as well as dry eye disease as well. It’s pretty crazy.

Dr. Shefali Miglani:
And have you noticed any correlation to device use and how much devices use your kid’s patient population? You know, goes through, you know, can you tell us a little bit about that and the change in the past year?

Dr. Todd Cohan:
Yeah. It’s been really crazy because I mean, with, you know, everything has been switching, at least in our area of the country to, you know, get rid of, burn the textbooks, and have everything online anyway, I was mind-boggled when my kids were in elementary school and they’re doing math on their iPads for two hours at home. It’s just crazy. You’re not getting away from the screen time. Also in the world. They used to always say that near-sightedness or myopia would typically slow down in the summer months. Why? Because kids are outside playing, they’re being kids. Right. And now the problem is, is these kids that go there at the bus stop, you can take pictures of them every morning on their phones. They’re heads down on the bus stop playing games, texting, tik-toking, whatever he may have been.

Dr .Todd Cohan:
They’re on the devices. And what’s really bad is that standardized tests at school, then that’s all done online too. I mean, my daughter came home and she’s like, I have a headache. I was on the computer for four hours, and then when they came home, they did their homework on their iPad or Macbook or Chromebook and then time to play Fortnite. And they’re on that computer. I mean, it’s like, it’s, it’s, they’re, they’re glued, it’s like a third arm to do the screens and it’s really affecting the kid’s near-sightedness. And I think parents are finally starting to realize how damaging it is.

Dr. Shefali Miglani:
Right. So is Long Grove any different than the rest of the world, the rest of the United States, do you see kids playing outside at all?

Dr. Todd Cohan:
No. Hardly at all. I mean, you know, we’re probably similar in, in our generation, you know, we’d be outside playing and riding bikes till it came dark and things like that. And, you know, aside from organizing sports, the kids are playing that they’re a travel team, this travel thing that may be for a couple hour window a day, but their glued side, they’re not out and about. It’s rare when you see a group of kids biking down the street. I mean, it’s really, yeah, it’s really bad in our high school in particular, it’s like a top 30 high school, public high school in the country. And, you know, these kids are just thrown with all these intense academic demands, and now the way they connect socially is they’re on their phones. Right. My teenage daughter is as much as I yell at her, she’s on the phone, it’s eight o’clock, she’s watching TV and she’s on her phone. So it’s like, she’s the norm. Unfortunately.

Dr. Shefali Miglani:
Exactly. That’s what we see here in our household and hear from my patients in my practice. All right. So now walk us through what parents should be thinking about as their kids return to school.

Dr. Todd Cohan:
So, you know, there’s been lots of stuff in the news about blue light, blue light, blue light. Personally, I educate patients this way. I said blue light does prove to mess up your sleep patterns and things like that. But more importantly than anything else. Cause we gotta reduce the eye focusing demand. We got to give kids a little bit of magnification to relax their eyes. We have to, if we start seeing near-sightedness, we want to kind of stop it. And I always tell patients, I’d rather be proactive than reactive. I’d rather do something proactive for your children to stop your kid’s near-sightedness rather than waiting on the sideline, watching them get worse year after year, after year, I always try to educate them. And I think parents appreciate this in the exam room because you know, mom and dad would always say, you know, do this, do this, do this.

Dr. Todd Cohan:
But if they’re hearing it from a doctor who they trust and they’ve been going through for a while saying, you know what, you know, little Johnny, you really need to take breaks, go outside, you know, put a timer on your Fortnite every half-hour, walk around the house, do a Cartwheel. I don’t care. Give your eyes a break every once in a while. And I think they like hearing that taking breaks and things like that. But parents, you know, everybody, you go to a restaurant they’re glued to their screens. I mean, it’s brutal. It’s a terrible travesty these days.

Dr. Shefali Miglani:
So kids have been home, uh, you know, for so long on their computers. What should the parents be on the lookout for?

Dr. Todd Cohan:
So I think the parents should be on the lookout for, I mean, if they’re going like this and they’re watching TV, I mean near-sightedness and prescription changes aren’t one of those things where, you know, one day you notice that one day you’re not, it’s not like a light switch up. I can see, I can’t see. It has to deal with things like squinting, weird visual behaviors of people tilting their head to see or closing an eye when looking for distance or something in terms of, you know, getting closer to their TV or their phone, things like that. I mean, um, those are signs and symptoms that, you know, and always, and you’ve been in practice as long as I have, it never fails that there’s a mom or dad who comes in, says I had no idea, they were seeing so bad it’s every day. And especially the parents, who’ve never worn glasses or contacts until they’re 40 years old. So they don’t have any understanding of it. And they feel really bad, but it’s, you know, that’s the importance of routine eye care. We can check these minor changes every year.

Dr. Shefali Miglani:
So if their kids do have these symptoms of the children who do have these symptoms, what should they do? What should the parents do?

Dr. Todd Cohan:
Obviously, we say, get a comprehensive eye exam. For some reason that the lobby, the dentist lobby is ingrained for 50 years, go get your teeth cleaned twice a year. Well, I always joke we can, you, you can learn, you can get straight A’s with, with tartar on your teeth or cavities. You can, you can’t get straight A’s if you can’t see. So, you know, I always tell them it’s so important to come in every single year. And our state Illinois has a really good job. Beginning of getting the kids in for kindergarten eye exams, state mandate. And I think it is in most states now, but we really in our practice enforce the fact that, and emphasize how important it is to come in every single year, check the healthy eye and check the prescription changes because this day and age with devices, it’s brutal. But, um, we still, you know, there’s, uh, every, every, every month we have a kid that hasn’t been in since their character exit for kids fifth-grade and it’s a minus two prescription for those of you who don’t know, it’s pretty, near-sighted, can’t even see the ear on the wall with that prescription.

Dr. Shefali Miglani:
So what are some go-to therapies for myopia management?

Dr. Todd Cohan:
So I’ve been, um, certified orthokeratology since 2003. Um, that’s one of the companies, in particular, that was one of when they kind of first started. So we’ve been doing it for, oh my gosh, 18 years now. That’s been our primary focus. In that, since I was the first thing you have the group we’ve since added the last couple of years, uh, after being therapy as well, um, which entails using an eyedrop at night to kind of defocus the, I would do some of that eye strain and that slows down the prescription changes as well. Um, we typically do that in the younger population. Um, you know, most kids around eight, nine years old can handle the special contacts at night or contact lenses during the day that have a multifocal re reducing the strain when they look up close. But that’s what it’s about.

Dr. Todd Cohan:
It’s all about reducing the eyestrain. If you don’t like it, I always tell patients, look, if you’re on the treadmill 10 points, oh, guess what? You’re gonna get tired and it’s gonna wear you out. Same thing. That’s what’s happening all day every day. So we really try to Institute the therapies that, but they’re Candace seven and a half, eight years old, depending on the child’s responsibility, since these are FDA approved and so completely healthy and safe. I mean, in all our years, 18 years, knock on wood or whatever. We’ve never had any issues whatsoever of kids not being able to wear the contacts at night or do the attribute therapy and we’ve seen amazing results.

Dr. Shefali Miglani:
Right. And, um, what about behavior modification? Do you talk to the kids or the parents and the examiner? What about that?

Dr. Todd Cohan:
Okay. In terms of behavior modification, again, taking breaks, we always like them to be a kind of arm’s length distance for their screens or computers. Well lit lighting, not looking down like this good posture, those types of things, not on the couch mean you saw it. It was like, you know, an epidemic of kids in their pajamas all year, last year with their Macbooks or computers or iPads just laying in their bed like this. And it’s just, it wasn’t very good. And they’re closer to the screen, which is further increasing eye strain. So does that kind of stuff that you go over as well?

Dr. Shefali Miglani:
Absolutely. You know, we go over a lot of behavior modification and, and, you know, you, you summarized it pretty, you know, on point finally tell us, uh, one piece of advice that you would give for the parents who have kids and their eyesight, uh, seems to be getting worse.

Dr. Todd Cohan:
Well, I would definitely say this. The thing that frustrates me every day is the fact that this is not new technology. This technology has been around for, well, it used to be called, orthokeratology kind of like orthodontics for your eye. I think they’ve been doing that in China for like 50 years or something like that. And it wasn’t as nice and comfy as it is now, but they did it. So when paid parents come in and they say, whoa, this news, how come my other doctor never told me this, it’s just really upsetting to me. And the fact that there are so many of our colleagues that work in all different facets of eyecare, whether it’s the retail chains or a surgical center, or a private practice setting, and everybody needs to be educated from a practitioner’s point of view. And it, oh, if you don’t do it in your office, that’s fine, but refer to someone that does, because in the end, we all know, I don’t think anyone can argue that you’re not using the patient’s best interest in mind slowing down their prescription. If there’s something we’ve done, where are they just trying to monetize and their pair of glasses every single year. So in terms of a patients to answer your question a parent’s perspective, if, if you’re out there and you haven’t heard about this, we’ll do some, you know, Googling and figure out someone in your area that does, because you want to be able to, um, make sure your child is being taking care of as best as they can be.

Dr. Shefali Miglani:
Perfect. Perfect. All right. Let’s wrap up today. We spoke to Dr. Cohan, fellow optometrist, and owner of foresight vision, and then now a proud who’d myopia care specialist. Thank you doctor for your time today. Hope to see you soon.

Dr. Todd Cohan:
Sounds great. Thanks so much.

About Dr. Shefali Miglani

Dr. Shefali Miglani is a practicing Optometrist and a Myopia Management Specialist. As the Chief Medical Officer of Hoot Myopia Care, she helps to design clinical guidelines, create content and oversee all the clinical aspects of the platform and works with other doctors in the Hoot community to help manage progressive myopia in kids. She has her own private practice called Monroe Eye Care, in Monroe Township, NJ 08831, where she sees families with comprehensive eye care and specializes in myopia management of kids. She and her husband Bob Miglani together raise their three children in New Jersey.

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