What are the Causes of Myopia?

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What are the Causes of Myopia?

Myopia is nearsightedness.In case you’re unable to see distant objects, you likely have myopia.Studies indicate that myopia is the most common ophthalmic condition.

In fact, more than 22.9% of people worldwide suffer from nearsightedness. And myopia is increasingly affecting children between the ages of 7 to 18.

Let’s discuss the causes, symptoms, and treatment for myopia:

What is Myopia?

Myopia, also known as short-sightedness, refers to a prevalent condition of the eye. People can see nearby objects clearly, but if they’re farther away, they appear blurry.

Typically, the condition occurs because light refracts at odd angles due to the shape of your eye or curved cornea. Consequently, distant vision becomes blurry.

It also happens when the eyeball is genetically too long compared to the focusing power of the cornea and lens. Due to this, the light focuses in front of the retina instead of the surface, causing blurry vision.

What are the Causes and Risks of Myopia?

While there is no specific cause of myopia that has been confirmed, there are several factors such as: genetics or family history, increase amount of near work and lack of time outdoors especially in children. While the direct causes are not known, there is scientific evidence that suggests that increase use of electronic devices in children including online schooling during the pandemic has caused a greater incidence of childhood myopia.

A leading cause of myopia technically speaking is the structure of your eye. In case the eyeball is too long, or the protective outer layer is too curved, images focus in front of your retina.

Experts call this phenomenon a refractive error. Myopia may be of several other types:

High Myopia

A severe form of myopia. In this condition, the eyeball grows more than it should, becoming exceptionally long from the front to the back.

Apart from making it difficult for you to look at distant objects, it also raises your chances of suffering from other conditions like cataracts, detached retina, and glaucoma.

Degenerative Myopia

Otherwise known as malignant myopia or pathological myopia, Degenerative Myopia is a rare form of this condition. The cause of degenerative myopia is believed to be genetic.

In this, your eyeball grows longer too fast, leading to severe myopia, typically during your teenage or early adult years.

This type of myopia may worsen during adulthood and leads to an increased risk of suffering from a detached retina, glaucoma, and abnormal blood vessel growth.

Night Myopia

Some people experience blurry distant vision during nighttime only. With night myopia, your eyes may have difficulty focusing on objects properly.

At the same time, it may be because the increased pupil size during darker times allows unfocused light rays to enter your eyes.

What are the Symptoms of Myopia?

Some of the most common symptoms of nearsightedness are:

  • Blurry vision when trying to look at distant objects
  • Headaches as a result of eyestrain
  • Squint or partially close your eyelids to see clearly
  • Difficulty seeing while driving a vehicle, in some cases, especially during nighttime

Nearsightedness is typically detected during childhood. Here are few common signs:

  • Persistent headaches
  • Rubbing their eyes frequently
  • Needing to sit closer to the movie screen, tablet, television, or in front of the classroom

To Sum it Up – Diagnosis and Treatment

If you think you have myopia, consider getting an eye exam. Your doctor may recommend getting glasses or contacts if your progression isn’t rapidly increasing.

Increasingly myopia management doctors offer myopia management treatments such as Orthokeratology lenses, Atropine drops or dual focused contact lenses to help slow down the progression of myopia in children.

The goal of a sound myopia management program provided by your Optometrist should be to slow down the progression because myopia cannot be reversed. We cannot go back. Only look to slow down it’s progression so that it reduces the potential risk.

Next Steps: Find a myopia management specialist near you by clicking this link.

Myopia is nearsightedness.In case you’re unable to see distant objects, you likely have myopia.Studies indicate that myopia is the most common ophthalmic condition.

In fact, more than 22.9% of people worldwide suffer from nearsightedness. And myopia is increasingly affecting children between the ages of 7 to 18.

Let’s discuss the causes, symptoms, and treatment for myopia:

What is Myopia?

Myopia, also known as short-sightedness, refers to a prevalent condition of the eye. People can see nearby objects clearly, but if they’re farther away, they appear blurry.

Typically, the condition occurs because light refracts at odd angles due to the shape of your eye or curved cornea. Consequently, distant vision becomes blurry.

It also happens when the eyeball is genetically too long compared to the focusing power of the cornea and lens. Due to this, the light focuses in front of the retina instead of the surface, causing blurry vision.

What are the Causes and Risks of Myopia?

While there is no specific cause of myopia that has been confirmed, there are several factors such as: genetics or family history, increase amount of near work and lack of time outdoors especially in children. While the direct causes are not known, there is scientific evidence that suggests that increase use of electronic devices in children including online schooling during the pandemic has caused a greater incidence of childhood myopia.

A leading cause of myopia technically speaking is the structure of your eye. In case the eyeball is too long, or the protective outer layer is too curved, images focus in front of your retina.

Experts call this phenomenon a refractive error. Myopia may be of several other types:

High Myopia

A severe form of myopia. In this condition, the eyeball grows more than it should, becoming exceptionally long from the front to the back.

Apart from making it difficult for you to look at distant objects, it also raises your chances of suffering from other conditions like cataracts, detached retina, and glaucoma.

Degenerative Myopia

Otherwise known as malignant myopia or pathological myopia, Degenerative Myopia is a rare form of this condition. The cause of degenerative myopia is believed to be genetic.

In this, your eyeball grows longer too fast, leading to severe myopia, typically during your teenage or early adult years.

This type of myopia may worsen during adulthood and leads to an increased risk of suffering from a detached retina, glaucoma, and abnormal blood vessel growth.

Night Myopia

Some people experience blurry distant vision during nighttime only. With night myopia, your eyes may have difficulty focusing on objects properly.

At the same time, it may be because the increased pupil size during darker times allows unfocused light rays to enter your eyes.

What are the Symptoms of Myopia?

Some of the most common symptoms of nearsightedness are:

  • Blurry vision when trying to look at distant objects
  • Headaches as a result of eyestrain
  • Squint or partially close your eyelids to see clearly
  • Difficulty seeing while driving a vehicle, in some cases, especially during nighttime

Nearsightedness is typically detected during childhood. Here are few common signs:

  • Persistent headaches
  • Rubbing their eyes frequently
  • Needing to sit closer to the movie screen, tablet, television, or in front of the classroom

To Sum it Up – Diagnosis and Treatment

If you think you have myopia, consider getting an eye exam. Your doctor may recommend getting glasses or contacts if your progression isn’t rapidly increasing.

Increasingly myopia management doctors offer myopia management treatments such as Orthokeratology lenses, Atropine drops or dual focused contact lenses to help slow down the progression of myopia in children.

The goal of a sound myopia management program provided by your Optometrist should be to slow down the progression because myopia cannot be reversed. We cannot go back. Only look to slow down it’s progression so that it reduces the potential risk.

Next Steps: Find a myopia management specialist near you by clicking this link.

About Dr. Shefali Miglani

Dr. Shefali Miglani is a practicing Optometrist and a Myopia Management Specialist. As the Chief Medical Officer of Hoot Myopia Care, she helps to design clinical guidelines, create content and oversee all the clinical aspects of the platform and works with other doctors in the Hoot community to help manage progressive myopia in kids. She has her own private practice called Monroe Eye Care, in Monroe Township, NJ 08831, where she sees families with comprehensive eye care and specializes in myopia management of kids. She and her husband Bob Miglani together raise their three children in New Jersey.

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